Home/Lower Body/Functional Training Concepts – Should you force your feet straight?

Functional Training Concepts – Should you force your feet straight?

There has been quite a bit of talk in relation foot position in a functionally sound stance. I have found some major problems with people acknowledging this problem and just telling folks to “just point your feet straight forward”.

I’m sorry to say it, but addressing such a deeply embedded dysfunction on a human body is not so easy. This is especially concerning when people still don’t understand the implications of dysfunction and how the majority of it starts from the integration of the Diaphragm and Transverse Abdominis.

In this video I break down 1 of several reasons why queuing this foot position only creates more compensation, and sets the foundation for problems in the future. If you want to employ truly “functional training”, you have to address dysfunction, no shift it to another place.

Train intentionally,
not habitually,

Naudi


Preview the 10-Week FP Online Course


Comment Using Facebook

2017-01-18T20:26:28+00:00 November 7th, 2014|Lower Body|4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. sammy cheum November 7, 2014 at 1:06 pm - Reply

    hey whats the best exercises for me too do for a flat foot and a knot in my knee??

  2. Tony Bryan November 8, 2014 at 7:05 pm - Reply

    Knowledge is power! Follow up on more of your seminars!

  3. Jerry pearl November 11, 2014 at 9:57 am - Reply

    Complicated subject for sure. I enjoyed your presentation regarding feet pointing out dysfunction. Integrating all pertinent muscles at the same time and not in isolation makes a lot of sense when trying to establish correct neuromuscular connections for a long term solution.
    Also, I purchased the pelvis/hip video and if I want to purchase your complete functional posture program, I’d be paying for that module again because it’s 1 of the 5 modules included in the program. Any suggestions?

  4. Chrys Kub November 23, 2014 at 3:36 pm - Reply

    good points about muscular and neural integration. Also consider structural limitations which need to be assessed. If the structursl alignment is money (ie anteversion in hips) feet may indeed need to be allowed to intoe slightly to prevent stress to the other joints. Interesting

Leave A Comment