The Quadriceps are maybe the most significant compensating muscle-group when a person sits at a desk all day. Sitting continuously for many hours a day creates an over-development of hip flexion, which then leads to poor activation of the Gluteus Maximus. We must understand that if one major muscle-group isn’t working, other muscles have to bare the load, in this case, the compensating muscles are the Quadriceps. There are 4 parts to the Quadriceps, but there’s one specific area I want to talk about. This muscle is called the Rectus Femoris.

The Rectus Femoris Carries 2 actions, it extends the knee and flexes the hip. Since it does both of these actions, when it gets tight it can severely inhibit proper function from your hips (limiting the glutes) and knees (limits knee flexion). In most cases of an Anterior Pelvic Tilt, this muscle is one that is highly responsible for setting the dysfunction in place. For knee issues, it can be extremely dominant and can begin to pull on the patella to the point where it can create pain, which is usually the precursor to an ACL/MCL injury.

In this video, I cover how it is that I release the Quadriceps with a Medicine Ball. Enjoy 🙂